Archive for the ‘interfacing’ Category

History Of The Easter Bonnet


Garland in white organza Derby bonnet with pink and violet rosettes

 

Although bonnets started out as a practical form of head wear they became more and more elaborate as the 19th Century progressed. Worn initially to keep the hair tidy when indoors and the dust and sun off of it when outdoors, women would wear a heavier bonnet for winter and a lighter one, possibly made from straw for spring. By the early twentieth century, Americans became more and more invested in the Easter outfit—the hat, in particular. Because Easter coincides with seasonal fecundity, women garnered fresh flowers to wear in their hair and in their bonnets. Lilies, daffodils, azaleas with their red, pink or even crème colored blooms, and Hyacinths in purple and white were, and still are considered traditional Easter flowers. Fabrics such as organza, tulle, netting, satin and seersucker are just a few popular materials that helped to create a crown of Easter glory fit for the occasion.

Preserve Your Precious Pattern Pieces with Old Interfacing


Looking for a really great way to preserve your precious pattern pieces? Have a roll of old, lightweight, fusible interfacing just waiting to be put to use? Whether woven or non-woven, here’s a cool way to turn your less than impressive interfacing into pattern piece additions that strengthen and preserve at the same time!

Step 1:

To start, pull out a piece of non woven fusible interfacing and a piece of tissue pattern paper to test. Cut  your interfacing so that it is only slightly larger than your tissue paper piece, then iron together. Keep your iron on the STEAM OFF setting only.